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Eddie Jobson Forum



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 YES
Author: jetsrush 
Date:   02-01-07 16:39

moved



Post Edited (02-01-07 18:01)

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 Re: YES
Author: jetsrush 
Date:   02-01-07 18:07

Eddie,

I'm a big fan of your music and can still remember walking through the West Village blasting the Night after Night album on my boom box. Lots of stares and lots of questions like "how does that Guitar player get those sounds ?". Anyway, I always wondered why you never hooked up with Yes during the multiple Wakeman exits. You seem to be a perfect fit as far as your keyboard skills and would have in my opinion contributed a great deal with the violin.

Thanks,
Dave
NYC

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 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   02-01-07 18:13

jetsrush.........welcome to the party..........

love and good vibes (and marimbas)

gogo

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 Re: YES
Author: jetsrush 
Date:   02-01-07 18:44

Thanks gogo - I hope the web admin adds some keyboards to the background. Eddie is one hell of a fidler but his keys is what really made me a fan.

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 Re: YES
Author: EJ 
Date:   02-01-07 22:29

Hi Dave, welcome to the forum and thanks for your question.   We have an "Ask Eddie" thread, and the whole Yes question happens to be next in line for answering.   To tell you the truth, I have been procrastinating with this one as I have always had a policy of trying not to criticize other professional musicians, and so this answer will be a bit of a challenge.

Eddie



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 Re: YES
Author: jetsrush 
Date:   02-03-07 04:53

Great to be here - Looking foward to your answer.

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 Re: YES
Author: jetsrush 
Date:   02-23-07 19:35

Cmon Eddie answer the question. Stop putting it off - Go for it !!!

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 Re: YES
Author: webmaster 
Date:   02-23-07 21:28

OK Dave, go easy...... EJ hasn't been on the forum for a while. My deal with him was that this forum wouldn't cause him more stress or add to the demands made on him. Let's give Mr. Jobson some space here.

Webmaster



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 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   02-24-07 00:12

Eddie Jobson is the greatest musician of our age.

It is an honour to be here.

love

gogo

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 Re: YES
Author: Helen 
Date:   02-24-07 01:26

I'm sorry if I added to his stress by wondering where he was. I'm just missing him, worrying about him, hoping he is okay.

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 Re: YES
Author: Dusty 
Date:   02-24-07 20:58

I ain't sayin' nothin'...

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 Re: YES
Author: mats 
Date:   02-26-07 03:42

I've always been wondering who played the violin part on Yes 90125 song "LEAVE IT". On the original recording, it is barely heard, but on the remix and remastered issue, there's a clear violin part, that is brought up in the mix. It's DEFINITELY not sampled, though that album was recorded in the heydays of samples.

Now, is it Eddie that plays on that one, uncredited?

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 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   02-26-07 03:52

Hi Mats and welcome; you'll find the answer here:

http://relayer35.com/Yescography/90125.htm

-->

"Special thanks" are given in the liner notes to Dipak, Graham Preskett, Charlie Olins, Phil Carsons and Richard Steinberg. Preskett was a session violin player who had earlier worked for Steve Howe. He plays all the violin parts on 90125, not Jobson as some assume. Olins, later keyboardist in Nikki Squire's Esquire band, probably played some sessions for the album.





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 Re: YES
Author: Dusty 
Date:   02-26-07 04:25

"Preskett was a session violin player who had earlier worked for Steve Howe. He plays all the violin parts on 90125, not Jobson as some assume."

That's true - the chap in question has a website...

"Olins, later keyboardist in Nikki Squire's Esquire band, probably played some sessions for the album."

Interesting orts from the table Milly. I always liked Esquire (except for the Nikki Squire bit); in fact I bought my copy of their debut album in Amsterdam. So there.

I thought the bass player in Esquire (Nigel.... something) was superb. Being conspiratorial in nature, I am convinced he's Chris Squire under a pseudonym. I seem to recall he sounds just like him.

There's also a drummer on one track called "Dinky Diamond". This is an excellent name for a drummer, or indeed anybody else.

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 Re: YES
Author: timmybass 
Date:   02-26-07 09:40

Esquire? OH MAN. This thread and Rich(hiltonius) mentioning Spys in the "pre-midi keyboards" thread is absolutely taking me back to my teenage days. Too bad I no longer possess a turntable to play my copy of Esquire.

I totally agree with Dusty. The bass player was very Chris Squire as was Jon Camp of Renaissance.

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 Re: YES
Author: JF 
Date:   03-01-07 04:29

Norman "Dinky" Diamond was the drummer with Sparks. He played with them in their 70's heyday. Unfortunately he hanged himself '04.

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 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-01-07 04:34

Another drummer?... this is getting bizarre...





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 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-01-07 10:04

I find that Jon Camp (of Renaissance) played more like Chris Squire as their career progressed. Always wondered about that. Funny, cos he didn't start that way.

love

gogo

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 Re: YES
Author: EJ 
Date:   03-17-07 18:15

OK folks... you asked:

I have been thinking about my hesitation in answering in detail about my time with Yes, and have concluded that a full explanation would be incomplete without some understanding of the social background of the London music scene in the ‘70s and ‘80s.    To give a thorough and honest answer, I would have to get into some very personal recollections and history… and I have decided that too many personal details, especially of others, would serve nobody well.   So, after 23 years of silence on the matter, here is a somewhat abridged version:

I remember, around 1974 and still a fairly fresh teenage transplant to “the South,” observing there to be quite a self-congratulatory social club (of which I was not a member) of successful musicians, moneyed hoorays and fashionistas occupying the trendy upper-end London social tier.   They drove Bentleys and Aston Martins, lived in very large houses in Surrey (or trendy apartments within a stone’s throw of Knightsbridge or Chelsea), belonged to the same charities, and met one another for lengthy alcohol-soaked lunches and dinners at London’s most tony restaurants and private clubs.   A small subset of this crowd was a sorority of ‘group wives’ who spent large amounts of their husbands’ money shopping on the Kings Road and who effervesced at sharing a charity event with Princess Fergie or being invited to a garden party at McCartney’s mansion.

As a young musician, this social environment formed much of the elite backdrop to the world of the successful ‘art’ bands (Roxy, Genesis, Floyd, Yes, etc…) and I remember vividly—even as Roxy were at the top of their game and at the top of the charts—a strong sense of estrangement from this self-impressed and moneyed social clique.   As naïve as it may have been, I really was in it for the music.

However, my Roxy association did allow me some lesser place in the club, and my talent gave rise to many requests for my musical participation, including one call, in 1974, to assess my interest in replacing the newly departed Rick Wakeman in Yes.    My impression of Yes was that they were a musically very impressive (and of course, extremely successful) band, but that they, too, were hugely impressed with their own status and were living on a lavishly grand scale.   There also was that hippie/cosmic/druggie side that I knew would likely make it even harder for me to connect with them socially.   For several years, I had seen Chris Squire showily driving around town in his huge and very distinctive maroon Bentley like some aristocratic Lord, and it seemed obvious that, as dismissively as Roxy and their camarilla were treating me, the Yes milieu would be even more unfriendly to this Northern teenager – so I boldly conveyed my ‘lack of interest’ in the Yes gig (in actual fact, I was somewhat excited by the concept of playing with Yes at their peak, but my instincts told me this would be an unwelcoming situation).

Fast forward almost six years… I had extricated myself from that disturbingly self-important London scene completely, from EG Management and Sun Artists (Yes’ management—who co-managed ‘UK’) and had happily relocated to the U.S., permanently removing myself from what I found to be an uncharitable world of supercilious people and expensive drug habits.   Around the same time, I also disbanded U.K.—as part of the same purge.   It was a fresh start, and the Green Album would be my solo venture as an independent free-spirit, surrounded by new friends—dare I say ‘all good people,’ with similar values to mine.

However, in early 1983, toward the end of the Green Album period, I received a call from an executive with Atlantic Records who was with Chris Squire and his new band “Cinema” in London.   Despite my complete lack of interest in joining Squire’s new band, the phone conversation went on for several hours as he virtually begged me to participate on their new album (the record that would become “90215”) .   This time my ‘lack of interest’ was real, I literally had zero enthusiasm for being in Squire’s band back in London.   So original Yes keyboardist Tony Kaye was invited in for the album recording (which also apparently didn’t work out either, as he departed at the producer’s request after a very short period, leaving the keyboard duties to the production team.)

Later that year, with the Green Album finally completed, I happened to be visiting London as part of a promotional tour when I received a message (in the U.S.) that ‘Cinema’ was now ‘Yes,’ Jon Anderson had joined the band again, and that the album had come out really well.   Oh, and they still needed a keyboard player...   When they found out I was actually in London, new boy Trevor Rabin arranged to come round to play me the finished album.   Trevor Horn (my favourite producer at the time) had done a fantastic job.   All in all, though musically a little superficial, it was a fresh and contemporary recording, and with the ‘Yes’ name, a potential hit song (“Owner of a Lonely Heart”), Atlantic Records, and a well-funded support team behind it, it was clearly destined for considerably more commercial success than my struggling Green Album.   With unlimited amounts of money flying around, my living in Connecticut was no problem; Jon was living in France, and Rabin and the new manager were living in Los Angeles.   After all these years, maybe it was time for me to finally join Yes?

A couple of days later, we got together in a rehearsal room and thrashed through a few tunes, including ‘Roundabout’ (actually not knowing the song too well, I had to figure out Rick’s tricky keyboard parts on the spot – no easy task).   But everyone seemed happy, so I returned to the U.S. as a full member of Yes and with a world tour only two or three months away.   There was virtually no contact with anyone for several weeks as I learned all the Yes material in my home studio, although I did attend the mastering of the album with Rabin in New York.   In fact, now I think about it, not one single band member ever called me, for any reason, during my entire stint with the group (or since).

The illusion of ‘equal membership’ soon became apparently false, especially once the filming of the “Owner of a Lonely Heart” video took place.   Lord Squire’s indulgences (and the ubiquitous Bentley) were back in my face, and money was being squandered at an alarming rate.   It was time-warp back to the 1970s.   Roadies followed you around making sure you never had to lift even the smallest bag, and Chris was insisting on a private Boeing 707 for the tour!   The grand lifestyle was being funded once again and egos were newly inflated.   Despite my considerable experiences with Roxy, Zappa, UK, and Tull (a wonderful group of guys who treated me with considerable respect), and with more than 30 albums and a self-managed solo career under my belt, no one was interested in any wisdom I may have been able to impart, on any subject… even on the keyboard rig design which had already been decided upon.   It was an inflated ‘Spinal Tap’ on so many levels, and I had unwittingly been sucked back into almost the same world of disregard that I had rejected so many years earlier.   But I had made a commitment and I wanted to see it through.

Several weeks later, back in the U.S. where I continued to work on the considerable Yes repertoire, I did finally receive a phone call from someone—it was the manager who had been given the unceremonious task of informing me that Tony Kaye was re-joining the group and would be sharing keyboard duties with me.   No discussion, no conferring… a done deal.   And the reason?   They needed three original members to put to rest a dispute with Brian Lane (their old manager), Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman regarding the legitimacy of the new band using the ‘Yes’ name.   My youthful instincts were reawakened, there were red flags waving, and sirens going off... why was I doing this exactly?   Still no call from anyone in the band, no discussions of alternate remedies, no apologies, just take it or leave it… so I hearkened to the words of their own song and chose to ‘leave it.’

Of course, the album and world tour went on to enormous success; Tony Kaye’s playing was supplemented by another player hidden off-stage; and the embarrassingly lame video had to be edited at the insistence of the BBC (to remove the disgusting ‘maggot’ scene), during which time they also removed as many of my scenes as possible.

Thanks, guys.   All in all, the most disrespectful and unpleasant of all my band experiences (as brief as it was), and, with the occasional derisive remark from Squire or Allan White still showing up on the internet, one that still causes me undeserved anguish, embarrassment, and regret.

Post-script 1: The above description of the smug coterie that made up much of the British music-business elite in the ‘70s and ‘80s also serves the purpose of explaining much of the ill-feeling left percolating in the memories of more than a few of us more music-focused professionals.   It also explains, in some part, the continuingly rude behaviour of some of that scene’s most indulgent subscribers (not mentioning any particular Arschlock by name, of course).   It is ironic that those most included in that most exclusionary clique, now seem to be the most embittered and malicious.

Post-script 2: Some might ask why I would have a Yes page on the website.   My answer is that I don’t have a category for ‘Bands I Didn’t Join and Should Have’ or for ‘Bands I Did Join and Shouldn’t Have.’   It was not a Guest Appearance; I was a member; there is a long history of connectivity (from Bruford to Asia); I am still in the video; I have pictures; it is part of my story.

Post-script 3: Jon Anderson has always been friendly, welcoming and respectful.   His only culpability in this hurtful episode was in being so passive.



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 Re: YES
Author: Helen 
Date:   03-17-07 20:57

Who and what you are, Eddie, everything that you stand for and that we know you for, your uncompromising integrity, honesty, human decency - it all shines through in the above painful and heart-rending paragraphs. Thank you for telling us about it.

We love you forever.

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 Re: YES
Author: Dusty 
Date:   03-17-07 22:38

Sincere thanks, Eddie, for your response.

It makes for tough reading in places - I can't believe the cavalier approach taken by the band and their management towards you, given your heavy reputation in music - but enthralling all the same, at least for me...

Their loss, I guess.

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 Re: YES
Author: Lenny 
Date:   03-17-07 23:13

Sorry to read you had this bad experience Eddie, but as a fan it's good to know what really happened. Thanks for telling.

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 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-18-07 01:44

Wow... it gives me the shivers imagining how lonely you must have felt in that plastic world. It's the kind of life you expect R&B and metal bands to lead, not those we all thought were serious musicians. A little pathetic too if you know that C. Squire apparently can't afford any decent pants, telling from what he wore on stage the last few times I saw him :-)))). Born poor and remaining poor all his life...
Well, I can't say you've made any bad choices there Eddie, except maybe for even considering joining Yes in 1983 ;-).

>(not mentioning any particular Arschlock by name, of course).

Of course not...





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 Re: YES
Author: hiltonius 
Date:   03-18-07 08:51





Post Edited (10-07-07 07:00)

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 Re: YES
Author: Marzzz 
Date:   03-18-07 10:55

Thank you for sharing that- it obviously wasn't easy for you (on many levels) and we greatly appreciate it.

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 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-18-07 17:03

Eddie, you are my hero !!!!!!

........and MAN !
Are you gonna clean-up on this year's forum awards !

love to all
Gogo

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 Re: YES
Author: lakemist 
Date:   03-18-07 17:58

At this point I'm almost numb. The little respect that I had (very little actually) for Yes has now morphed into, well, something less. You stand for all that I hold dear Mr. Jobson, and I thank you for that. With you it is about the music, that's why in 100 years when Yes is a mere footnote you will still be recognised as one of the best ever. Rock on EJ!



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 Re: YES
Author: TZ_Keyz 
Date:   03-19-07 20:55

Eddie: I just shook my head as I read your post about "Yes." In my mind, they should have been ecstatic to have you in the band. To pair you up with Tony Kaye is just silly. I understand totally why you declined. I would've thought a man with your talent & experience would be immune to that type of BS. Having gone through a negotiation recently with the manager of a well known British guitarist who lives on Long Island, I understand the feeling of being disrespected. I submitted 3 audition files via email and received no email or return telephone call acknowledging they received them. I know I nailed the material. 6 weeks later I get an email "we haven't heard from you, are you still interested? We love your work!" Then come to find that financially I couldn't even think of doing the tour. I hate talking to managers when you should really be talking to the artist(s). TZ

PS Hi "hiltonius" I know you're out there somewhere. We knew each other a bit during the Kingdom days.

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 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-19-07 22:23

Where does one even start ?..............

First, I would like to compliment Eddie on his writing style.
Great structure, honest and flowing.

I got to read the YES answer with the suit-wearing girls behind the
front desk of a real snazz hotel, and everyone loved the story !

The second paragraph, (around 1974)....fascinating.
I have always day-dreamed about this scene.
Having grown up with all that strong music, and never having been any part of that community, I always pictured the environment to be magical, and all the people super cool and enlightened. I even felt quite ripped-off that I wasn't there at that time.

But I suppose, well, the reality is; people are people, no matter who, or where.
And a big drunk, and big ego, is the same here, or there, and just as boring,
and frustrating, if that is not what you set out to experience.

In many ways, this sounds like Vancouver, British Columbia, in the
mid-late 1980's. Different (corny) music, different people, but same effect.
So I guess I didn't miss out on all that much.

And in many ways, this YES experience is typical.
A world of power and politics.
I think KillMyMusic nailed it in response.
It can be very, very lonely.
Trying to fit in. Thinking that you are pulling it off.
And having people point and say "you are different."
When you didn't even DO anything, and then THAT is the problem.
Underestimated.......watching money be flushed away.......
...........knowing that it all has to be paid back.

As an instrumentalist wishing to make a living
by playing with rock bands, one has few choices :

a) Do your OWN trip exclusively, work hard, hope for the best.....OK..
b) Be a sideman with ANY e$tablished act, be a personality chameleon........
..or........c) Join an e$tablished act with nice people, have fun
and do your own trip at the same time. And GO FOR IT.............

But you will never know who is who,
and what is what, until you give it a try.

I think Eddie was both
brave to join that band,
and Brave to quit !

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 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-19-07 22:30

....bottom of the page:
http://www.blazemonger.com/GG/interviews/derek-rubin.html

NOTE: I disagree with the first bit,
but find the last bit interesting.......
______________________

JR: Do you ever have the desire to perform again? Would Giant ever reunite?

Derek Shulman: Occasionally I get the urge but I'm an old fart. Who wants to see an old fart on stage? That's like Las Vegas. The old bands are tired, go see the new ones. If Giant got back together and toured, it might burst your bubble. It wouldn't be the same. The chapter's closed. Leave it alone.

Up until two months ago, I had Yes on my label. I have a box up there with tapes of Billy Sherwood [of World Trade; he almost joined Yes before the eight- member reunion project happened. ed.] singing "Lift Me Up." Yes is a business proposition. I wouldn't want to do it for that. I'd rather sell shoes. If you're going to do it for music, then do it for music, not for business.

gogo

Post Edited (03-19-07 22:36)

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 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-21-07 09:37

I have to take this in a few points:

1).......... the keyboard rig design which had already been decided upon:

This is typical of start-up bands that have a big push.
But if the person playing the rig has any experience,
and management wants players to feel like a part of the show,
the design really should be his (her) art.

Telling Eddie Jobson what the rig will be
is like picking out a wig for Mozart.
I protest.
The fans know the difference.

I hate to think of what the violin designs would have been.

With all due respect, the whole idea is
delusional and I can't imagine anyone
having the bollocks to even suggest it.

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 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-21-07 09:54

>I hate to think of what the violin designs would have been.

There wouldn't have been room in the band for violin anyway.





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 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-21-07 10:10

......totally.........


OK, folks, you are gonna have to be patient with me on this one.............


Topic:
They needed three original members to put to rest a dispute with Brian Lane (their old manager), Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman regarding the legitimacy of the new band using the ‘Yes’ name.   

Well........
a) Why does the band have to be called YES ?

b) Why not settle by hiring Peter Banks as second guitar player ?

c) Why is this suddenly an issue ?
YES had not had 3 original members for a long, long time.

d) In fact, the last YES band, and album, had ONE original member.

e) Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman are not original members.
Again, with all due respect...........
Why were they even involved involved in this dispute?
If they were concerned, why did THEY not play and tour this album ?
And how does hiring Tony Kaye help secure their future ?

f) And later, why did they not need three original
members for 1999's THE LADDER ?

JON ANDERSON -- lead vocals
STEVE HOWE -- lead and acoustic guitars, steel, mandolin and vocals
IGOR KOROSHEV -- keyboards anf (sic) vocals
BILLY SHERWOOD -- guitars and vocals
CHRIS SQUIRE -- bass guitars and vocals
ALAN WHITE -- drums, percussion and vocals
Rhys Fulber -- dance loops
  Derry Burns -- trumpet
  Tom Colclough -- alto sax
  Tom Keenlyside -- piccolo and tenor sax
  Rod Murray -- trombone
  Neil Nicholson -- tuba
Randy Raine-Reusch -- world instruments

g) What does any of this have to do with the MUSIC ?

love
GOGO

PS, I am not actually looking for answers.
Just ranting for the heck of it.

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 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-21-07 10:30

>OK, folks, you are gonna have to be patient with me on this one.............

Oh no, not again!

(just joking)





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 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-21-07 10:32

a) Why does the band have to be called YES ?

'No' is already taken.

Well, the name 'Asia' is even a bigger problem if you ask me.





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 Re: YES
Author: timmybass 
Date:   03-21-07 14:22

I know answers aren't requested, gogo, I can't resist... may I speculate?

a) Why does the band have to be called YES?
Bottom line... $$$. Read on further for explanation...

I was under the assumption that Rabin wasn't too keen initially on the YES thing. $$$ might have changed that... Eddie.... you hung out with him....???


b) Why not settle by hiring Peter Banks as second guitar player?
Squire, White, Rabin were the band Cinema. The songs were Rabin (the seeds anyway). Rabin is too proficient as a guitarist and/or vocalist. And, more importantly, it would mean another cut of the $$$.


c) Why is this suddenly an issue? YES had not had 3 original members for a long, long time.
I bet the dispute was really between Brian Lane and Chris Squire. And it's all about the $$$.


d) In fact, the last YES band, and album, had ONE original member.
Good. Now we all know who to ask for a refund. (again $$$ ;-) )


e) Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman are not original members. Again, with all due respect... Why were they even involved involved in this dispute?
Wakeman probably didn't care or even own a share in the Yes corp. Howe was in Asia making $$$ probably suckered into it by Brian Lane. Howe and Downes were the only members remaining in YES after Drama. I believe they were, by default, the owners of the YES name as the other members all quit. Oddly enough, I think Howe was quoted as saying he didn't even want the YES name after the band split up!


And how does hiring Tony Kaye help secure their future?
I presume it was Squire's play to build a bigger team for arguement in court. Squire needed the YES name to secure more $$$ from Atlantic for the recording, tour support, extravagant meals forcing him to be late for performances... Atlantic wouldn't have thrown as much $$$ at a new band called Cinema. But YES was guaranteed BIG $$$.

"[in the courtroom] ...see, look over here, we've got more original dudes than you do... na, na, na, na, na, na, na... Where's my money, please?" ;-)

sidenote - I heard Tony Kaye was paid the equivalent of $10,000 US dollars by Brian Lane when he was booted from YES in 71(?) for his share of the band/royalties/etc.


f) And later, why did they not need three original members for 1999's THE LADDER ?
I don't think anyone cared to argue because there wasn't enough $$$ or interest in YES to fleece from at that point. I could have sworn they were at Emo's during SXSW that year. (kidding - Austin, TX joke)


g) What does any of this have to do with the MUSIC ?
Absolutely nothing - musically. I believe from the record company's point of view it has been about $$$ since the Beatles showed how profitable music could be. There may have been a few pockets of artistic freedom in the 60's and 70's but MTV pretty much squelched that!

For the record, I love the Beatles, I do not like MTV post 1983 nor what it did to music by turning it into a predominantly visual medium. I remember having dinner with John Ashton and hearing a colorful story about Seymour Stein, Madonna and MTV concerning this. And for the record, Psychedelic Furs actually "scored" with MTV!!! ;-)

Musicians have been getting the short end of the stick for a long time. Go see their live shows whenever you can. Buy the music direct from them whenever possible.

And Eddie, it breaks my heart to hear that you had to endure such greedy people. I can only imagine what the shows would have been like with you trading riffs with Trevor Rabin. IMO, the two of you are of similar strengths and backgrounds musically - pity - you two would have set the stage on fire!



Post Edited (03-21-07 16:29)

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 Re: YES
Author: Marzzz 
Date:   03-21-07 16:54

I was under the impression that Squire was the one person who managed to retain rights to the name "Yes." Witness ABWH, essentially 4/5's of Yes' classic lineup, yet they couldn't use the phrase "an evening of Yes Music" in their concert promotions.

"Here am I dreaming
I stand by myself
Look and it's easy to see, that,
I'm not the only one reaching for a new kind of wealth
Reaching with nothing to hide"

Yeah, right.....

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 Re: YES
Author: Dusty 
Date:   03-21-07 18:10

"e) Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman are not original members. Again, with all due respect... Why were they even involved involved in this dispute?
Wakeman probably didn't care or even own a share in the Yes corp. Howe was in Asia making $$$ probably suckered into it by Brian Lane. Howe and Downes were the only members remaining in YES after Drama. I believe they were, by default, the owners of the YES name as the other members all quit. Oddly enough, I think Howe was quoted as saying he didn't even want the YES name after the band split up!"

I thought that Howe either owned the rights to the name YES or the actual Roger Dean cosmic, groovy, swirling YES logo/brandname/registered trademark.....let's all raise a Coke and call it the Dynamic Ribbon Device!

But even if this is not so or was never thus, someone must own it. And if someone owns something, you generally need their permission, and there's usually some kind of remuneration for the "owner", copyright holder/smart guy.

If ever a band had identity problems it was this one - Yes East, Yes West, New Yes, Old Yes, Classic Yes, Diet Yes, Yes with all the calories taken out but with the same great taste, Yes with all the flavour taken out and extra calories..... I Can't Believe It's Not Yes!!!....... "in n out the roundabout...fa..la..la..laaaa...whatever..."

I don't know if this kind of soap-opera is that unusual in Rock. What's surprising is that there was still enough interest in a band like Yes at the time. And for the stakeholders, I guess it paid off.

Speaking of "paid off":

"sidenote - I heard Tony Kaye was paid the equivalent of $10,000 US dollars by Brian Lane when he was booted from YES in 71(?) for his share of the band/royalties/etc."

Bruford claims he had to PAY Brian Lane $10,000 for the privilege of LEAVING Yes, back in '72. One can only deduce Bill must have REALLY wanted out. But it just how shrewd he is in that he definitely extracted value for money: it's the most famous thing he's ever done.

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: timmybass 
Date:   03-21-07 18:54

~HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA~

Thanks Dusty. The permutations of YES are absolutely a riot!

.... "I can't believe it's not YES!!!" .... HAHAHAHAHA... I'm crying over here!

.... hey, who knows, maybe Bill was paying in for Tony's debit ...




BTW - did anyone hear about the new YES spinoff called CIRCA. Band consists of Billy Sherwood, Tony Kaye, Alan White and Jimmy Haun. Haun played on the Union (pronounced onion) recordings. I guess that means he's a previous member of YES. That means they possess 4 out of the 4,322 previous members of YES.

They were unsuccessful in pirating the band name.

Anyone want to take a guess at who makes the cut for next years 40th anniversary album and tour? I think it's the 25th anniversary of 90125, too.

I vote Eddie Jobson put Zinc back together for an album and tour!



Post Edited (03-21-07 19:06)

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 Re: YES
Author: lakemist 
Date:   03-22-07 16:56

"Just Say No".......to Yes.



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 Re: YES
Author: Dusty 
Date:   03-23-07 03:46

Thanks timmy, I checked the Circa thing...

See... they should just call that "Maybe"...

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 Re: YES
Author: Marzzz 
Date:   03-23-07 08:13

http://www.break.com/index/amazing_fiddle_player.html

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 Re: YES
Author: wildberry 
Date:   03-23-07 11:17

Marzzz wrote:

> http://www.break.com/index/amazing_fiddle_player.html

Talented, yes......(a pun there kids!)
However, IMHO, with his command of the violin.....wouldn't it be MUCH more interesting if that guy playing the acoustic violin were to attempt to PUSH the envelope.....?
Possibly to write his own music for the sake of musical expression without JUST trying to impress upon us his technique......?


ONCE AGAIN.....I AM A BIG FAN OF EDDIE'S VIOLIN PLAYING BECAUSE OF HIS.............M U S I C A L ................APPROACH!

Eddie's careful choice of HIS: GREAT melodies, SIMPLE passages where needed, POWERFUL climaxes, and the employment of INCREDIBLE technique (electric technique too!) ONLY as a vehicle of musical nirvana make for a class act!

ANNNNNNNNNND a note here if you don't mind.....
the use and knowledge of electronics not withstanding.....are EVERY BIT as important as violin technique when playing ELECTRIC VIOLIN.....the choice, use of, and great familiarity with: pre-amps....effects processors......stage amplification.....mics used....cords chosen (curly or straight depending on stage movement) etc...etc.. are at LEAST as integral to the over-all concert experience as the violin itself.........and Eddie was a fantastic pioneer in all of this stuff!!!

Eddie's ELECTRIC violin took us on MANY great adventures........i.e. trips down the UNbeaten path so to speak, and thank you for it Eddie!



Post Edited (03-23-07 13:32)

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 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-23-07 13:20

RIGHT ON Wildberry!
And inspired are we..........

love
Gogo

gogo

Post Edited (03-23-07 15:05)

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 Re: YES
Author: Marzzz 
Date:   03-23-07 13:57

Sorry, but didn't you think it was a least a little bit fortuitous to come across that video now, given the topic and personages involved?

"Swoosh!"

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-23-07 14:06

No I didn't, it was too late though, Rich beat you to it ;-)

http://www.eddiejobson.com/forum/read.php?f=1&i=4236&t=4236





Post Edited (03-23-07 14:17)

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: Marzzz 
Date:   03-24-07 08:45

Oops- it was buried in the middle of a Gogogogogogogogogogo post and I missed it!

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: wildberry 
Date:   03-24-07 09:31

Marzzz wrote:

> Sorry, but didn't you think it was a least a little bit
> fortuitous to come across that video now, given the topic and
> personages involved?
>
> "Swoosh!"


Fortuitous??? perhaps.....yeah, I suppose you're right.....

I guess I'm growing weary of acoustic instruments, especially violins, being showcased covering dreary pop songs as SPECTACLE...! at the sake of music, really.....
I thought Kronos Quartet had the first and last word in that department almost 20 years ago! And they chose fine pop classics to boot.

However, as long as we're discussing YES......I think it would be way cool if Depue, (the violin player in the video) were to cover a MOST beautiful ditty by Jon Anderson from the album Fragile; ' We Have Heaven'

He can do it.........covers ALL the bases: beautiful motifs and melodies, complex rhythms and extreme technique required!



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 Re: YES
Author: Marzzz 
Date:   03-24-07 10:22

wildberry wrote:

> I guess I'm growing weary of acoustic instruments, especially
> violins, being showcased covering dreary pop songs as
> SPECTACLE...! at the sake of music, really.....
> I thought Kronos Quartet had the first and last word in that
> department almost 20 years ago! And they chose fine pop
> classics to boot.

Have anyone done an "electric/tronic" string quartet? I am thinking of a string quartet, but with electric violins, viola, cello with all the effects (similar to EJ on his solo violin)? The closest I can think of to this would be the eight-piece string section used during Bjork's "Homogenic," but I am not really up on the "violin thing."

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 Re: YES
Author: wildberry 
Date:   03-24-07 12:02

Marzzz wrote:
> Have anyone done an "electric/tronic" string quartet? I am
> thinking of a string quartet, but with electric violins, viola,
> cello with all the effects (similar to EJ on his solo violin)?
> The closest I can think of to this would be the eight-piece
> string section used during Bjork's "Homogenic," but I am not
> really up on the "violin thing."

Bjork is absolutely BRILLIANT.....HER use of strings is VERY musical and interesting as well!

I have a pile of worn out bows that says she's an EJ fan!



Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-24-07 12:03

I love this violin talk.
The thing about Eddie's violin playing is....(one of the things, anyway)....he always saves it for the special moment. Does not play long notes behind the guitar solo to try to fill in the sound.

It is treated as a solo instument, up front. And live, when he picks the instrument up, ALL EYES are on him, cos he didnt stand there all night holding the thing, playing background drones.

....I have a YES rant cooking ....

love gogogogogogogogogogogogogogogoggogogogogogo

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: peter2 
Date:   03-24-07 12:27

There's a BIG discussion on Progressive Ears about Eddie's Yes-statement. The thread has six pages now and is still growing.

peter

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 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-24-07 13:43

Interesting...





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 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-24-07 13:44

And Rich is mentioned too :-)





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 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-24-07 14:45

Them folks are also welcome to talk about it HERE.

love
Gogo

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 Re: YES
Author: EJ 
Date:   03-24-07 15:17

Interesting development to this thread: yesterday I received an email from Chris Squire.   In it, he made a technical correction to my post... his car was a Rolls Royce Continental ("the last one they ever made").   Overall, the tone of the email was extremely complimentary and polite.

Nothing more to add at this point.

EJ



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 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-24-07 15:20

>In it, he made a technical correction to my post... his car was a Rolls Royce >Continental ("the last one they ever made")

HAHA!! At least he has a sense of humour! :-)))))





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-24-07 15:34

Wonderful !

Chris Squire is a great singer.
I always thought his vocals were the real trademark of YES.

But, I was told it was a Silver Cloud 3.
Shows how bad my sources are.

love
Gogo

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-24-07 15:45

Did he mention anything about a new wardrobe for the next Yes-shows?





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 Re: YES
Author: Marzzz 
Date:   03-24-07 16:14

EJ wrote:

> Nothing more to add at this point.

Hmmmm...............!

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-24-07 23:22

I wish to strongly encourage EJ and
Mr. Squire to form a new friendship.

You are icons of the Art Rock movement.
A very special part of the music of our society.

EJ told it like it is, and Mr. Squire understands and respects that.
It was a different time.
Let's deal with the NOW.

We are all here to teach, grow, and to learn.
This is an opportunity to set an example and enlighten all.
The wheels are already in motion.
Together we stand divided we fall.......
and more importantly, friendship makes everyone feel really good.

Perhaps this is the is the "new kind of wealth" that Squire sings about.

EJ, thank you for sharing this with us.
I feel really good about this being a healing and enlightening experience for us all.
Thank you for taking a leadership position.

love
Gogo

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: EJ 
Date:   03-25-07 19:11

I did not wish for my candid response to the Yes question be turned into a gossipfest in the blabosphere… 150 responses to my remarks on the Progressive Ears website alone.   And in trying to be honest with the members of this forum, I am now viewed by some of the uninformed mouse-waggers out there as another self-absorbed rock star, a preening prima donna, etc.   People just love this silly stuff.

More as a response to the Progressive Ears forum than this one, let me clarify a couple of things: Firstly, I have no problem with people making large amounts of money—in music or anywhere else—or in them driving nice cars.   I drive a very nice car myself and have been lucky enough to afford a comfortable lifestyle in a nice part of town—good for me.   The point of the remarks was to set the stage for a description of ‘a scene’ made up of people who, generally, treated those not in the clique in a somewhat chilly and supercilious manner.   As a 17-year-old from down-to-earth County Durham, this posture was undermining and unkind.   We were all pretty young then, but I was the youngest one of all—even at the formation of UK, which was post-Curved Air, Roxy, Zappa, and, excluding Tull, was even post-all of my guest appearances (with King Crimson etc.), I was still only 22.

Secondly, I do not live my life as a self-pitying victim; on the contrary—I consider myself to have been lucky and privileged to have had a successful band career as part of an amazing musical movement, one that I retired from at the age of 25.   And, although a few negative feelings and memories do remain—usually in connection with the lack of generosity of a small handful of people—I remain admirers of them as musicians and have long outgrown any ill will toward them personally.   Rather than acrimony, any residual sentiments tend more toward feelings of loss—the lost opportunities to create something meaningful, forge good memories or friendships, or simply make the best of life and our musical situation.   Let me also add that I understand how certain personalities would perceive me as priggish, but it never feels good to be viewed in a way that you know you are not.

Speaking of which: can we please put this ridiculousness behind us regarding stage makeup?   I don’t want to be a spokesperson for face paint.   I spent much of my early teens in and around the theater, particularly the one run by my father.   To me, if you walk onto a stage, whether you are David Bowie or John Kerry—it’s theater.   Even if you are in denial about it, if you have an audience… you’re putting on a show.   Personally, I was never terribly comfortable on stage being stared at and, to this day, I seriously dislike having my photograph taken.   It is one of the reasons I left the spotlight and stopped performing live so many years ago.   However, my job in 1973 was to ‘replace’ the highly flamboyant Brian Eno in Britain’s biggest glam-rock band at the age of eighteen.   Roxy embraced and promulgated the idea of theatricality, and portrayed a complex image that referenced a certain 1920’s-Berlin androgynous decadence not really understood by most, especially in the U.S.   It’s why Andy Warhol loved us.   This was a band with a fulltime majordomo/valet on staff.   At the same time, I remember my late friend John Entwistle telling me about Roger Daltry showing up to gigs well dressed, and then changing into a t-shirt and ripped jeans for the show—it all made complete sense to me.

During my several years with Roxy, I became pretty adept at dealing with stage makeup myself and became distrustful of the pancake ladies at the BBC.   Of course, both Zappa and the bearded, pipe-smoking farmers of Jethro Tull gave me some grief over that particular ability, but always in good humour—Ian Anderson even gave me a makeup bag as a gag birthday gift once—however, both Frank and Ian had flirted with the idea for themselves by the time I had left their bands (Ian couldn’t do it though because he sweated it all off).   By 1984, and the shooting of the “Owner of a Lonely Heart” video, of course I would do my own face paint(!)… it was lights, camera, action all over again.   Why both Allan and Chris felt a need to mention it in interviews—I’ll leave for others to figure out.

I think I am done now with answering the Yes question.

EJ

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: Helen 
Date:   03-25-07 21:56

Again dear Eddie, I (and I'm sure this goes for the other forum members as well) love and respect you and everything about you. I haven't read the responses on Progressive Ears yet, and I'm not even sure I want to. I know there will be nothing new there. I've become used to the nonsense people say and write about you. To be honest, I find it more intriguing than anything else. I like you in make-up, I like you not in make-up, I like you in any car, anywhere you happen to be, as long as you're happy. You've brought me nothing but happiness through your music and by being the amazing person you are. I will be devoted to you forever because you mean so much to me. On top of everything you are the best musician there ever was or will be, so let's just forget about all this nastiness once and for all. Thank you for sharing something that is so painful for you with us.

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-25-07 22:38

... have long outgrown any ill will toward them personally......BEAUTIFUL !

..... theatricality.......BEAUTIFUL !

...Andy Warhol....BEAUTIFUL !

Life is a celebration of life.

love
Gogo

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-25-07 22:52

Why explain the make-up thing at all? Everyone was and still is using it; nobody seems to have problems with Marilyn Manson, Fish, Peter Nicholls, and Peter Gabriel using make-up and worse, they're praised for it too. It's a non issue to me.

I was surprised by the fact that most of the contributors on Progressive Eears are still respectful on this subject, some not well informed, but at least they're behaving, I have seen worse on the internet, and some of the others, well... I can only imagine them having a lot of money and not knowing how to deal with it, but they're so easy to recognize even without the money.





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-25-07 22:53

BTW... what car is it?





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 Re: YES
Author: Marzzz 
Date:   03-25-07 22:54

People walk in sideways pretending that they're leaving,
We put on our makeup and work out all the lead-ins,
Jack is in the alley selling tickets made in Hong Kong,
Promoter's in the pay box wondering where the band's gone,
Back in the pub the governor stops the clock,
Rock is dead, they say,
Long live rock.

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-25-07 23:05

Are you going to see The Who Marzzz? ;-)





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: Marzzz 
Date:   03-25-07 23:09

No, I just missed them about 3 weeks ago here- in fact, we saw Bob Seger the night before in the same venue in AZ.

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-25-07 23:19

And please say it's not a BMW...





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: Marzzz 
Date:   03-25-07 23:23

Milly is not fond of BMWs and their drivers, obviously!

(btw- performance cars are a bit of a waste in Los Angeles, what with all the traffic on the 405, etc.)



Post Edited (03-25-07 23:26)

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-25-07 23:32

Sounds familiar... I'm sure it's worse over here though ;-).





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-25-07 23:54



Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-26-07 00:22

:-))))





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: hiltonius 
Date:   03-26-07 05:13

my friend gary green is very kind and gracious to remember me on the Green Album sessions, but it's not true that I was "the engineer on the session" - I was the assistant engineer on that session. clay hutchinson was the engineer.

who my friends
Rich



Post Edited (10-07-07 07:27)

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-26-07 05:45

My motto: do whatever you want, people will talk anyway.





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: Dusty 
Date:   03-26-07 05:58

It's good to have a motto!

"il plurius invectus harmonium"

"die lauder Magnum P.I."

"cultosaurus erectus"

or, put another way:

"I like snert"

or, put another way - in the form of a question:

Q: take off Marilyn Manson's make-up and what have you got?

A: just another human being (being a moron).

My motto:

"...echte Bakkers Speculaas bolgens bet aloude recept gebakken door bakker De Ruiter..."

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-26-07 07:54

Well... my first motto is:

"You'll only regret the things you don't buy"





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-26-07 07:58

>Q: take off Marilyn Manson's make-up and what have you got?

A woman?





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-26-07 10:19

hiltonius,
100% right on.
Really strong. The best.
Such words energize the start of this day......

love
Gogo

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: Faas 
Date:   03-26-07 12:54

Dear Eddie,

I haven't read the Prog Ears stuff, not because I'm not curious (I AM that), but will not read them either. Only walk in the dirt when you need to, otherwise take a small step to the left (or right if you will) and walk on. It takes a lot of guts to step out of the spotlight, especially at young age, and really follow a path less taken based on inner feelings (or secrets, pun intended). Shine in Grace...

The Netherlands

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: peter2 
Date:   03-26-07 17:13

Marcel,

the PE-thread on Eddie's Yes-experience isn't that dirty as you probably think. Apart from the few usual "malicious tongues" emitting their cynical chauvinist crap at every opportunity, the discussion is quite serious. Funny to watch Eddie's well known catalyst effect on the thread: they're digressing ... and digressing … to Synclaviers, soft-synths, Keith Emerson's keyboard-rig, etc.

I had to mention this as I'm feeling a little responsible, having posted the PE-notice here. I hope you're doing fine, my friend!

Peter

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-26-07 18:02

.....a little responsible.........
Let's go easy on ourselves.

This is communication
experimentation
a conversation
for the whole-world-nation.......

dippity-doo-bomp-boom-bomp-bah !

love
gogo

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: peter2 
Date:   03-26-07 18:22

Hey, I'm easy! Just reflecting on my actions. After all, I'm creating the world I'm living in … which takes some responsibility sometimes.

rock on,
peter

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: wildberry 
Date:   03-26-07 21:18

gogo wrote:

>

GOGO you are a nut!
Good to see that your fine taste in music is matched by your exquisite taste in;

A W E S O M E
CARS !!!!!

the Batmobile is NOT your daddy's Hummer!
you are too cool!



Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: EJ 
Date:   03-26-07 21:44

How did you know that's what I drove?... Brilliant.   Actually, I was very into cars when I was a boy, and one of the first things I did when I first visited Los Angeles when I was 19 was to visit the Hollywood Car Museum (then next to the Chinese Theater) where I saw this car, up close and personal [true story].   I knew then that this (or the Monkeemobile) would be my future ride.

EJ



Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-26-07 22:24

I'm glad it's not a BMW.





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: Marzzz 
Date:   03-27-07 00:35

geez, Milly, AGAIN with the BMW bashing? Just for that, I HOPE EJ has a beemer in his fleet!



Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-27-07 00:46

>I HOPE EJ has a beemer in his fleet

A fleet? Chris Squire will lap that up!





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   03-27-07 21:59

What a gas !
Speaking of famous '60s West Coast Cruisers,
the ol' Ken Kesey (acid test) Merry Prankster
bus is looking rather mossy these days.

Anyone ever hear the true story about
the Smithsonian Institution requesting
the bus for their display ? So Ken Kesey
gets in and drives the old heap all the way
from Oregon to Washington.

And when he gets there they said
"NO ! We wanted the OTHER bus !"
Because there was a first one
before the more famous one............'

Details.
People !
Get the details first !

.......and now back to our regular program..........

love

gogo

Post Edited (03-27-07 22:19)

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: klaatusuit 
Date:   03-29-07 11:26

> ...the world of the successful ‘art’ bands (Roxy, Genesis, Floyd, Yes, etc…) ...this self-impressed and moneyed social clique. <

NOT Genesis, not Genesis too pleassseeeeeeeeee. Eddie say it ain't so. I cannot live with the image of Tony Banks driving a Continental, Spider or whatever cruiser.

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-29-07 13:51

It's not about cars, Ruud, ít's about 'being on the scene'.

I love SUVs, BTW ;-) especially this one

And what's wrong with Spider?





Post Edited (03-29-07 14:02)

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: Fz 
Date:   03-29-07 14:31

Milly,

Love the video ! Maybe it will be at the Auto RAI tomorrow !
I 'll take a picture if I see it

Greetz
Ferry



Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-29-07 14:57

Go to the Volvo stand and ask for Sjef. If he's there, send him my love :-)))





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: klaatusuit 
Date:   03-30-07 06:18

> It's not about cars, Ruud, ít's about 'being on the scene'.

same thing, can't imagine Genesis members being part of this particular scene.

Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: KillMyMusic 
Date:   03-30-07 06:37

Well, I think Peter Gabriel and Mabel Wisse Smit are good friends... does that help? :-)))))))))))))))





Reply To This Message
 
 Re: YES
Author: Dusty 
Date:   03-30-07 07:03

They probably drive Aston Martin's though. Think I saw it on some documentary once.

Nothing wrong with that (provided you have a spare Toyota or something for when it's not going), but a lot of the Genesis guys must have rubbed shoulders with British aristocracy as schoolboys at Charterhouse back in the '60's. That's a seriously upper-crust Public School.

I'm not casting aspersions - everything I've seen/heard of Rutherford, Banks et al reflects well on them (like they care what I think). But there seems to be a uniquely English parochial subtext to the social scene that EJ described: North vs South.

It is of course, far more finely nuanced than that, but that's beyond the scope of this thread or my sociological knowledge. Not hard to do!

Alan White was a northerner, only he seems to speak with a transatlantic twang. Very different to his accent in 'Imagine' - the Lennon bio-pic.

I've always imagined Eddie to speak with the classic BBC Received Pronunciation. But now I've learnt he's from up north, I'm probably wrong! And then there's the fact he has lived in the U.S. for - what? - half his life.... he already embraced American spelling and grammar in an earlier post. How the hell did I get on to this. Who cares??

Ruud's post reminds me of this: I saw a documentary on the making of the Band-Aid song "Do They Know It's Christmas" back in 1984 (it was late and I couldn't sleep, OK) and, if you look carefully, standing behind Boy George's majordomo/valet, speaking animatedly with the members of Status Quo, is Eddie..... juuuuust kiddin'!

Anyway, they interviewed Phil Collins 'cos he played on that song and every other record released that year, and he talked of how he felt a bit weird at the recording session because he didn't know any of the pop stars! They knew him, obviously, but he wasn't part of that scene. He felt awkward. So here were the biggest British pop stars in 1984 and Phil felt like a pork chop at a synagogue!! The footage is really funny: it WAS the eighties and here are all these funny hair-do's and costumes and outfits, really outlandish stuff. And here's balding Phil wearing a vest - someone apparently described as looking like "a plumber". He was making his way down the corridor at SARM saying "excuse me, pardon me"... Made me laugh, that's why I like Phil. GREAT drummer. I always HATED that song. Lovely sentiment but pleeeeze...!!!

BTW: they interviewed Banana-rama (who?) as well. And, well... those girls are STILL just delightful, visually speaking. Would like to be part of that scene.

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 Re: YES
Author: klaatusuit 
Date:   03-30-07 14:41

< ll, I think Peter Gabriel and Mabel Wisse Smit are good friends... does that help? :-))))))))))))))) >

Surely they were just fishing!

Dusty, I believe Phil, Mike and Tony -they're my friends you know- always were the neighbourly kind. Despite their Charterhouse background they chose (rock) music and that proves enough. Apart of Phil trying to out run Henry VIII, I regard Genesis as the most honourable band of all times. The Beethoven of prog music.

.

Post Edited (03-30-07 14:42)

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 Re: YES
Author: jetsrush 
Date:   04-11-07 18:09

Eddie,

Yuk !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I am a Bass player and gigantic fan of Chris Squire. I was not expecting this. I do truly respect your honesty. I cant stand a-hole's. Obviously you are a man of character - but with your talent I think you should have looked at yourself as a studio musician regardless of the situation and reaped the financial benefits. But really, what the hell do I know. Good luck in the future.

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 Re: YES
Author: DavidBagsby 
Date:   04-24-07 11:03

I would like to thank Mr. Jobson for making his Yes story available. I was overwhelmed when I saw him in the press photo with Yes on MTV years ago and thought this would've been an amazing lineup. Also to discover his near miss with the Relayer project...again the mind boggles. The work on the Bulgarian Voices/Tony Levin cd is wonderful. I hope Mr. Jobson will find time to release some more music in the future. Zinc was very promising and the playing on the Bach Programme with Jethro Tull simply grand. Sorry to be so fan-ish, but anything I can do to encourage the muse through EJ is worth much prostration. All the best and please keep up the exemplary work!

Practice Non-Silence

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 Re: YES
Author: gogo 
Date:   09-28-08 14:24


Mr. Jobson,
You sure you dont wanna join this band ?

(kidding)

http://jonanderson.com/news.html

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